Thursday, 20 May 2021 05:49

Emerging from The Pandemic

Emerging from The Pandemic

Finally, the end seems to be in sight as restrictions on our freedoms imposed as a result of this virus can gradually be lifted. Hotels, pubs and bars are opening and people are being permitted to have gradually increasing levels of social contact. Notwithstanding this, we are still being urged to sensible with regard to "Face, Space and Fresh Air" to limit any virus transmission.

Taking these things into consideration, we have had numerous discussions about how we should relax restrictions at our two surgeries, allowing clients into the building. After much deliberation we can summarise this as follows, under those familiar headings.

Face

As in normal life, we will probably continue to wear face masks for some time, preventing spread of virus to friends, colleagues and clients. At the time of writing, the individual who has the disease but who shows no symptoms, the "asymptomatic carrier state", exists in about 1 in 19 people. As we often see more than twice that number of people in a day it's likely that we will meet at least 2 or 3 such carriers during the course of a working day. That being so, we will continue to require masks to be worn.

Space

Our waiting rooms at Stantonbury and Oxley are quite roomy, although we would probably need to restrict entry in order to maintain social distancing. In addition, Stantonbury has an "airlock" entrance for added pet security. This presents not only a bottleneck where clients may come into close contact, but also numerous contact points that would need to be continually cleaned. One solution might be to have someone permanently on the entrance to shepherd clients in and out of the building - but we unfortunately don't have spare staff to do this.

In any case, consulting rooms would present an insurmountable problem, in that, like many practices, they are only around 2.5-3m square. Close contact between members of staff of less than 1m is common when carrying out most procedures and maintaining control of pets. This close contact presents too high a risk between staff and clients, necessitating at least 2 members of staff in a consulting room, and with a third person present, social distancing would be impossible.

Thus even if we allowed clients into the building, you would still be unable to be present in the consulting rooms.

Fresh Air

This is the real clincher when it comes to access to the practice. In the 36 year history of this practice I can recall only one escapee, from the old Stantonbury Local Centre surgery, early on in that history. If I remember rightly it was a white poodle that lived on Stantonbury, and following it's successful efforts to evade staff and ultimately exit from the building it trotted off home. No harm done. We were very lucky! We have not had an escapee since, for over 30 years, and never from either of our current premises.

Animal security is therefore in our DNA and is second nature. Open windows and/or doors with free flow of fresh air is just asking for the additional free flow of patients to the great outdoors. Despite asking for dogs to be restrained on leads, and cats to be in carriers, there will always be a small minority of dogs with loose fitting collars or indeed harnesses that will be practised in extricating themselves from such restraint at will, and a small minority of cat owners that consider a blanket or that old cardboard box that the printer came in as adequate feline incarceration.

Considering all the above, at the moment it does not seem sensible or practical to change our current way of working. We may make exceptions later for some procedures, such as euthanasia. As time goes on, and hopefully more restrictions lift later this month and early next in response to fewer Covid cases and the control of current local outbreaks we will think again and get back to near normal working.

Wednesday, 19 May 2021 12:07

Pet Travel Arrangements

Pet Travel Arrangements

 Since leaving the EU travel arrangements for pets going to and coming from Europe have changed. UK issued Pets Passports are no longer valid for travel in the EU. Instead, they have been replaced by a system of Animal Health Certificates (AHCs) for travel to the EU and Northern Ireland. These certificates have to be issued within 10 days of travel, and are valid for travel within Europe for 3 months. Each pet (up to a maximum of 5) will require :

  1. a microchip
  2. a rabies vaccination
  3. worming for tapeworm if going direct to Northern Ireland, Ireland, Malta, Norway or Finland
  4. an Animal Health Certificate

If your pet has a valid EU Pet Passport, that can be used for entry into Europe, but to be valid the rabies vaccination must be up to date. UK OVs (Official Veterinary Surgeons) are no longer permitted to make entries into these passports, save for the recording of worm treatment which does not require the stamp and signature of an OV. An EU AHC will be required for entry into the UK. The most up to date information is available on the government web site gov.uk at :

Taking your pet dog, cat or ferret abroad

Saturday, 18 May 2019 10:57

Prep Area

Prep AreaThe Prep area as it's name suggests is the area where we prepare animals for surgery, in the operating theatre through the door in the far end.

In many ways it is the hub of the practice, with access to the dispensary, lab consulting rooms and reception from here, and also doors leading to the theatre, Xray area, and both kennels.

We also use this area for minor, non-sterile operations and for dental procedures.

The bank of kennels on the left are recovery kennels where animals or kept immediately post-op whilst they recover. Here we can keep an eye on them as they wake up, before returning them to their kennels.

Saturday, 18 May 2019 14:01

Stantonbury Reception

Reception Desk
The reception area is on of the most important areas in the practice as it is the first port of contact with the practice. In fact clients rarely see past this and the consulting room.

Appointments are made here, animals admitted, financial transactions performed, medicines dispensed, phone calls answered and many problems sorted out.

Our appointment system, like many other aspects of the practice management, is computer based. All diaries and clinical records are available, and can be updated live, from either surgery.

Saturday, 18 May 2019 10:57

Prep Area

Prep AreaThe Prep area as it's name suggests is the area where we prepare animals for surgery, in the operating theatre through the door in the far end.

In many ways it is the hub of the practice, with access to the dispensary, lab consulting rooms and reception from here, and also doors leading to the theatre, Xray area, and both kennels.

We also use this area for minor, non-sterile operations and for dental procedures.

The bank of kennels on the left are recovery kennels where animals or kept immediately post-op whilst they recover. Here we can keep an eye on them as they wake up, before returning them to their kennels.

Saturday, 18 May 2019 10:55

Practice Laboratory

 

LabAn up to date solid state chemistry analyser, and a laser cell counter enable us to process the vast majority of our routine diagnostic profiles, without having to wait for outside laboratories to receive and process samples.

The list of tests that the machine pictured left can do continues to grow, and will soon include less used assays, such as digitalis and phenobarbitone drug assay.

Lasercyte  
 

Much of the testing done, however, related to pre-operative blood testing to check patients for pre-existing, sub clinical conditions, such as kidney or liver problems, prior to the administration of anaesthetics for operations. These types of condition cannot be diagnosed any other way, and a clear blood test gives that added peace of mind when your pet has to have surgery.

 

Saturday, 18 May 2019 10:56

Pet Dental Clinics

Pet Dental Health Clinics

 We all know the importance of looking after our teeth and the same applies to your pet. Up to 60% of pets will have dental problems therefore your pets teeth should be checked on a regular basis! Our dental clinic not only offers a dental examination by a nurse but offers advice on how to clean your pets teeth and explains which types of food and treats are best to feed in order to help maintain healthy teeth and gums.

By far the most common problem is gum disease, which infects and destroys the teeth sockets causing otherwise healthy teeth to be lost. Gum disease occurs when plaque hardens and forms calculus which attracts further plaque. This in turn can lead to inflamation of the gums (gingivitis) and surrounding tissue area (periodontis). Should a nurse discover evidence to suggest a dental problem is either evident or beginning they will immediately recommend further examination by a veterinary surgeon who will advise you of the appropriate treatment.

Prevention is better than cure so remember your pet will benefit from regular brushing, oral dental chews and regular dental checks with one of our nurses.

Dental Clinics are free and are open to both cats and dogs so why not show your pet you care and book an apointment today.

Saturday, 18 May 2019 08:59

Weight Clinics

Weigh Club

Weight Clinics

 We strongly advise that before starting your pet on any weight loss programme you have him/ her assessed by a vet or veterinary nurse. From this you will not only learn what the ideal weight is for your pet and how this can be achieved but it will also help identify any underlying health issues  such as  a heart condition or diabetes that may be attributed to your pet being overweight. Currently some 40-50% of pets in the UK are thought to be overweight with as many as 20% being dangerously overweight! 

Our nurse lead clinics are designed to reduce your pet's weight in manageable chunks. At the beginning of the programme you will be given a Weight Record Chart where the progress of your pets weight loss will be recorded at each visit. Special low calorie diets are used, and the nurses who take the clinics are specially trained in their use. You will be given advice on what to feed how much and when. Your pet's weight loss will be monitored every step of the way as they are gently guided towards their ideal weight. For dogs advise will be given on a suitable exercise regime which will be determined by their age and lifestyle requirements.

Once your pet has reached his /her ideal weight our nursing team will continue to monitor their diet and exercise on a regular basis. This will ensure that your pet continues to benefit from being fit and healthy during all stages of their life. 

Tuesday, 21 May 2019 17:53

Oxley Park Surgery

Oxley Park Surgery

098

10 Cushing Drive,

Oxley Park

Milton Keynes

MK4 4TJ


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Saturday, 18 May 2019 10:19

Stantonbury Surgery

Stantonbury Fields Surgery

Stantonbury Surgery

Soskin Drive

Stantonbury Fields

Milton Keynes

MK14 6DT

  • Established over 30 years
  • Highly experienced staff in all fields of veterinary medicine and surgery
  • Purpose built Surgery building
  • Situated in a quiet, largely residential, area of Stantonbury Fields
  • Ample parking right outside the door
  • Separate cat and dog wards
  • All modern facilities, Digital Xray, Digital Ultrasound, Medical Cold Laser treatment and operating theatre
  • On line shop for discounted pet food and accessories for collection from the surgery
  • Long established Veterinary Nurse Training Centre

Surgery Times

Mon-Fri 8am-7pm

Sat 8am-12noon

Tel 01908 321115    Fax 01908 310977


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About Midsummer Veterinary Group

A small animal veterinary practice in Milton Keynes providing primary and secondary veterinary care for the pets of Milton Keynes

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